Anatomy of a Photo Shoot

June 01, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

BTSBTS It's been several weeks since I posted, we have had several projects we've been working lately, and am looking to sharing them on our blog. 

Last month we ventured out of our usual stomping grounds of Peachtree City and Tyrone and headed out to St. Louis for a couple of days of photography.  As soon as we checked-in to our hotel room, we got started on a High School Senior photo shoot.  The shoot was at an old, no longer used, train station.

The first photo on the right shows how shoot looks behind the scenes.  Nothing too fancy, a couple of flashes for fill light.  As I mentioned earlier, we used an old train station.  It is directly behind the Union Station Hotel in St. Louis  There are usually a couple of train cars (I think that's what you call them?), some train tracks that are safe for your subjects to use.  That part is nice, I could get photos on the train tracks, which are always popular, and not put my models at any risk.  The aluminum siding or the rail-car (that's what you call them!) makes for a great reflector too.

High School Senior photo taken behind the Union Station in St. Louis.Senior Photo ShootHigh School Senior photo taken behind the Union Station in St. Louis. The second photo is straight out of camera, no cropping, not even exposure or contrast adjustments.  It is a great photo, and I'm sure the subject would be very pleased.  She looks great, the composition is perfect and there's nice converging lines and shallow depth of field to add interest. .  I used an 85mm lens on a full frame camera which makes for very flattering portraits.  The greater than 45 degree bend at the elbow makes her look more dynamic and confident.

Sure, I could just stop there and call it a day.  If I was a baker I could pull a High School Senior photo taken behind the Union Station in St. Louis.Gobi Photography High School Senior ShootHigh School Senior photo taken behind the Union Station in St. Louis. cake out of the oven and say it's done.  Sure it would be delicious (cuz I'm and awesome baker!), but taking a few more minutes and adding some icing makes it more pleasing to the eye and makes it even tastier.  For my editing work, I almost exclusively  use Adobe Lightroom.  If I need to make some significant changes, like removing people or lamp posts, then I'll use Photoshop.  The edit in the third photo only took about 5 minutes (I have my own system that helps me get it done very well and really quick).

I strive to keep my portrait edits looking natural, and not like an obvious "photoshop" job.  I also wanted to give her a warmer, softer look.  I think it worked well.


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